admin

SciShow is supported by Brilliant.org. Go to https://Brilliant.org/SciShow to get 20% off of an annual Premium subscription. COVID-19 has the potential to ebb and flow with the seasons, but because it’s a novel pandemic, that doesn’t mean we’re off the hook this summer. While this episode was in production, an additional report was published in
0 Comments
An environmental silver lining is emerging amid the coronavirus pandemic: Many people have stopped flying and aren’t driving to work, leading to a drastic drop in carbon emissions. A study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Climate Change reveals that global carbon emissions per day in April were 17 percent lower than the average daily emissions
0 Comments
Check out Nature: Spy in the Wild 2 on PBS (http://pbs.org/spyinthewild) to follow more than 50 animatronic spy creatures as they go undercover in the animal world. And check out their YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/user/NaturePBS) for more great videos of the natural world. Birds fly, and fish swim. We learn this when we are children. But
0 Comments
To learn more about the fight to stop climate change go to https://gatesnot.es/3dkhdhH. Thanks to Bill Gates and Breakthrough Energy for supporting this episode of SciShow. Huge container ships relying on fossil fuels transport all kinds of goods across the ocean, creating a huge climate change impact. But there’s a better way to power this
0 Comments
From the spider in the corner of your house, to the moths in your attic, synanthropic species don’t just live among us, they literally depend on us to live. Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on
0 Comments
As far-fetched and futuristic as it might sound, researchers are working on turning jellyfish into ocean-exploring robots. Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Huge thanks go to the following Patreon supporters for
0 Comments
Scientists are closely watching SARS-CoV-2 to track mutations and see if it’s developed into different strains. So, has it? Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Huge thanks go to the following Patreon
0 Comments
Antarctica’s king penguins emit such copious amounts of nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, via their faeces that researchers went a little “cuckoo” studying them, according to a Danish scientific study published Thursday. “Penguin guano produces significantly high levels of nitrous oxide around their colonies,” said the head of the study, Professor Bo Elberling, of the
0 Comments
The next pandemic could come from the Amazon rainforest, warns Brazilian ecologist David Lapola, who says human encroachment on animals’ habitats – a likely culprit in the coronavirus outbreak – is soaring there because of rampant deforestation. Researchers say the urbanization of once-wild areas contributes to the emergence of zoonotic diseases – those that pass
0 Comments
A world only 2°C warmer, or 3.6°F, would be one that is much different than the world we live in today, but what does that actually look like? Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon:
0 Comments
A sprawling structure regarded as the world’s oldest known temple was designed with an understanding of geometric principles somewhat unusual for the hunter-gatherer cultures thought to have built it, researchers say. Göbekli Tepe in Turkey, widely viewed as the earliest place of worship ever discovered, is a vast Neolithic complex dated to over 11,000 years
0 Comments
The chaos and uncertainty surrounding the coronavirus pandemic have claimed an unlikely victim: the machine learning systems that are programmed to make sense of our online behavior. The algorithms that recommend products on Amazon, for instance, are struggling to interpret our new lifestyles, MIT Technology Review reports. And while machine learning tools are built to
0 Comments