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Half of the 1 million animal and plant species on Earth facing extinction are insects, and their disappearance could be catastrophic for humankind, scientists have said in a “warning to humanity”. “The current insect extinction crisis is deeply worrying,” said Pedro Cardoso, a biologist at the Finnish Museum of Natural History and lead author of
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When it comes to water on Earth, life finds a way. Even in the hottest, most acidic, and saltiest waters in the world, odds are you’ll find some kind of organism adapted to live in it. There is, however, a place with water so extremely inhospitable that no native life has ever been found there.
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Twins can be a lot more complicated than just identical or fraternal, and the rarer types of twins suggest that we have a lot more to learn about human development. Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron
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Sometimes there’s an archaeological find that makes all that laborious digging, careful brushing and meticulous cataloguing worth it – such as the 1,200-year-old board game piece that researchers have found on an island off the coast of northeastern England. This is thought to be a ‘King’ piece from a Viking board game hnefatafl (“king’s table”),
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Three years ago, the identification of Zealandia as a continent made global headlines. Now, newly published results from our scientific drilling expedition reveal the largely submerged Zealandia continent, which stretches across five million square kilometres beneath the southwest Pacific Ocean, was shaped by two tectonic events. First it was ripped away from Australia and Antarctica,
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In your brain the right side controls the left half of your body and vice versa. We still aren’t sure why this is, but some scientists have come up with a pretty bizarre explanation: that some ancient vertebrate ancestor was born with its brain on backwards. Or, at least on sideways. Hosted by: Michael Aranda
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Overlapping environmental crises could tip the planet into “global systemic collapse,” more than 200 top scientists warned Wednesday. Climate change, extreme weather events from hurricanes to heatwaves, the decline of life-sustaining ecosystems, food security and dwindling stores of fresh water – each poses a monumental challenge to humanity in the 21st century. Out of 30 global-scale
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Humans make a lot of noise! Transportation, industries, & how we work and play in natural spaces all have an impact on the sound we put out every day, and all this noise pollution is disrupting how animals use sound to communicate. Hosted by: Michael Aranda SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents.
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Last month was the warmest January on record globally, while in Europe temperatures were a balmy three degrees Celsius above the average January from 1981 to 2010, the European Union’s climate monitoring system reported Tuesday. Across a band of countries stretching from Norway to Russia, temperatures were an unprecedented 6°C above the same 30-year benchmark,
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Permafrost in Canada, Alaska and Siberia is abruptly crumbling in ways that could release large stores of greenhouse gases more quickly than anticipated, researchers have warned. Scientists have long fretted that climate change – which has heated Arctic and subarctic regions at double the global rate – will release planet-warming CO2 and methane that has
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Amongst all the different types of cancer treatment, photodynamic therapy - where light in is used to destroy malignant cells – might have one of the strangest side effects: patients are often better able to see in the dark. Now researchers have figured out why this happens: rhodopsin, a light-sensitive protein in the retinas in our eyes, interacts with a
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Composting becomes more widespread and accessible all the time, keeping millions of tons of food waste from ending up in landfills every year. But there is one quirk of some composting programs that can be a little annoying: they don’t accept meat scraps. But why? And are there ways to overcome this limitation? SciShow would
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Fireflies are in deep trouble, with many species facing extinction due to habitat loss and exposure to pesticides, according to the first major review of their global status, published Monday. Adding irony to injury, one of nature’s most entrancing spectacles is also being snuffed out by artificial light pollution, researchers reported in the journal BioScience.
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Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier hasn’t been doing so well. It’s close to irreversibly melting, it has a huge cavity growing underneath it, and it’s the poster child for everything wrong with our reliance on fossil fuels. But a robotic underwater vehicle called Icefin just snapped the first pictures of Thwaites’ foundations of the ocean floor, and
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Plants can get sick, but since they don’t walk around sneezing on each other, the things that infect them need some very weird strategies to spread. Hosted by: Michael Aranda SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———-
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