Month: August 2020

Go to http://Brilliant.org/SciShow to try their Solar Energy course. The first 200 subscribers get 20% off an annual Premium subscription. Locusts are a huge agricultural pest…except in North America. What happened to the Rocky Mountain locusts that once swarmed this continent? Researchers think that the colonization of the North American West might have had something
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Galaxies are already pretty huge, billions to trillions of stars whirling around a supermassive black hole. But that’s not where their influence ends. A large, spherical halo of gas surrounds a galaxy, reaching vastly farther than the main population of stars, a bit like a galactic atmosphere. Hubble observations of our nearest galactic neighbour, Andromeda,
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Go to http://Brilliant.org/SciShow to try their Knowledge and Uncertainty course. The first 200 subscribers get 20% off an annual Premium subscription. Octopuses have tons of strange and amazing adaptations that help them live their best lives underwater. And those incredible traits could help us in many ways. Hosted by: Michael Aranda SciShow has a spinoff
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Keeping qubits stable – those quantum equivalents of classic computing bits – will be key to realising the potential of quantum computing. Now scientists have found a new obstacle to this stability: natural radiation. Natural or background radiation comes from all sorts of sources, both natural and artificial. Cosmic rays contribute to natural radiation, for
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Animals have been hibernating for a long, long time, a new study shows. Researchers have analysed 250 million-year-old fossils and found evidence that the pig-sized mammal relation, a genus called Lystrosaurus, hibernated much like bears and bats do today. Finding signs of shifts in metabolism rates in fossils is just about impossible under normal conditions – but
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SpaceX is aiming to launch three rockets on Sunday, including two back-to-back Falcon 9 launches in Florida and a Starship test flight in Texas, if weather permits. The aerospace company said it intends to launch its twelfth Starlink mission at 10:12 am EST from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, sending 60 Starlinks into orbit. The second
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Songbirds in tropical rainforests curtail their reproduction to help them survive droughts, according to a study Monday. Species with longer lifespans were better able to cope with this environmental volatility than previously thought, researchers found. With more record hot spells gripping parts of the planet and biodiversity threatened by human encroachment on habitats, a crucial
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For as long as there has been a Universe, space has been expanding. It winked into existence roughly 13.8 billion years ago, and has been puffing up ever since, like a giant cosmic balloon. The current rate of this expansion is called the Hubble constant, or H0, and it’s one of the fundamental measurements of
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Go to http://Brilliant.org/SciShow to try out Brilliant’s Daily Challenges. The first 200 subscribers get 20% off an annual Premium subscription. Scientists found a species of wheatgrass that is resistant to fungus, but how it became resistant is both surprising and unclear. Hosted by: Michael Aranda SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check
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Plants have a seemingly effortless skill – turning sunlight into energy – and scientists have been working to artificially emulate this photosynthesis process. The ultimate benefits for renewable energy could be huge – and a new approach based on ‘photosheets’ could be the most promising attempt we’ve seen so far. The new device takes CO2, water, and sunlight
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Wormholes are a popular feature in science fiction, the means through which spacecraft can achieve faster-than-light (FTL) travel and instantaneously move from one point in spacetime to another. And while the General Theory of Relativity forbids the existence of “traversable wormholes”, recent research has shown that they are actually possible within the domain of quantum
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One ancient predator turns out to have been able to eat much larger prey than we thought was possible, and a baby titanosaur skull gives us clues about what changes took place as sauropods grew up. Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———-
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One potential avenue for cancer treatment uses electricity not from any outside machine, but from within our own bodies. Hosted by: Michael Aranda SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Huge thanks go to the following Patreon
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An 80-million-year-old embryo has revealed some unexpected features of the most titanic animals to ever have walked the Earth. Sauropods, such as Brontosauruses, which lumbered their way through the Jurassic and Cretaceous ages, are well known for their impressive size and long necks. But very little is known about their young. “The preservation of embryonic
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Self driving cars and self-repairing roads: the future of driving is bright, or at least less aggravating. Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Huge thanks go to the following Patreon supporters for
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Their signature black and white color scheme is part of what makes pandas instantly recognizable – but not many mammals are black and white, so… why do they look like that? Hosted by: Olivia Gordon SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a
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Where do dreams come from? It’s an age-old question, something people have been wondering and theorising about for millennia. Whereas ancient civilisations may have interpreted dreams as having supernatural or spiritual origins, in modern society, we’re more likely to analyse our dreams in terms of our waking life, looking for meaningful connections linking the content
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Scientists have created beams of light that are slower than a car! Not only that, but with the literal flick of a switch, they can freeze that beam of light in place! Hosted by: Michael Aranda SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming
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