Month: March 2020

In the South Pacific, there is a rare tree so rich in metal that its sap runs blue. Hosted by: Olivia Gordon SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Huge thanks go to the following Patreon supporters
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Go to http://Brilliant.org/SciShow to try out Brilliant’s Daily Challenges. The first 200 subscribers get 20% off an annual Premium subscription. Scientists who piece together our past can do so through the rare fossil or artifact, or they can go to one convenient location: a hyrax latrine. Hosted by: Olivia Gordon SciShow has a spinoff podcast!
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As people try to maintain social engagement during self-isolation, citizen science offers a unique opportunity. Defined as “public participation and collaboration in scientific research”, citizen science allows everyday people to use technology to unite towards a common goal – from the comfort of their homes. And it is now offering a chance to contribute to
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We humans couldn’t live without our gut microbes, but not all animals rely on microscopic digestive communities like we do. And understanding why these animals ditched their microbial partners can teach us a lot about the costs and benefits of making evolutionary friends. Hosted by: Michael Aranda SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow
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In 2017, scientists discovered what appeared to be an unkillable virus that does something very un-virus-like… it builds its own nucleus inside its host’s cells! Hosted by: Michael Aranda SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Huge
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Newly described wormlike fossils dating back over half a billion years might be our oldest ancestors, and researchers have mapped and visualized the physical structure of the microscopic communities growing on human tongues! Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by
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SciShow is supported by Brilliant.org. Go to https://Brilliant.org/SciShow to get 20% off of an annual Premium subscription. Renewable energy may be the way of the future, but in order to store that energy to make our grids more sustainable, we might need to take a look back at some battery technologies of the past. Hosted
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The ozone layer above Antarctica has recovered so much, it’s actually stopped many worrying changes in the Southern Hemisphere’s atmosphere. If you’re looking for someone to thank, try the world at large. A new study suggests the Montreal Protocol – the 1987 agreement to stop producing ozone depleting substances (ODSs) – could be responsible for
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Bats are amazing and not just because they’re the only mammal that can fly! But they also carry a lot of diseases that are dangerous to humans, and while that is definitely not their fault, there is actually a lot we can learn from their unique immune systems. ———- Huge thanks go to the following
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The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) delivers once again! Using its advanced imaging instrument, the High Resolution Imaging Experiment (HiRISE) camera, the orbiter captured a breathtaking image (shown below) of the plains north of Juventae Chasma. This region constitutes the southwestern part of Valles Marineris, the gigantic canyon system that runs along the Martian equator. The
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Scientists have found naturally occurring superconducting materials in extraterrestrial objects for the first time, discovering superconductive grains embedded inside two distinct meteorites that crash-landed on Earth. The discovery is just the latest to show that meteorites are much more than space debris that falls out of the sky. Recent investigations have turned up meteorite-borne deliveries
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When we began mass-producing matches in the 1800s, workers in the factories started dying mysteriously. The history of our sparking little flame-sticks is darker than you think. Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow
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