Month: February 2020

Recent reports from scientists pursuing a new kind of nuclear fusion technology are encouraging, but we are still some distance away from the “holy grail of clean energy”. The technology developed by Heinrich Hora and his colleagues at the University of NSW uses powerful lasers to fuse together hydrogen and boron atoms, releasing high-energy particles
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The climate crisis poses an escalating threat to scientists everywhere and research of all kinds, scientists in Australia are now warning. The unprecedented wildfires sweeping their nation have been a “brutal wake-up call” to a simple fact: their work is “far from immune” to climate change. In all its physical and practical glory, science is
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Go to http://Brilliant.org/SciShow to try their Physics of the Everyday course. The first 200 subscribers get 20% off an annual Premium subscription. You might have noticed that lots of drugs have special children’s formulas, and you might think that’s because smaller people need smaller doses. But you’d be wrong! Because kids aren’t just tiny adults.
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Scientists have used super high-speed cameras to capture the moment liquid droplets combine together, providing a unique, preternatural glimpse of fluid dynamics the human eye can’t observe on its own. Using an experimental setup involving two synchronised high-speed cameras – one shooting from the side, and the other looking upwards (courtesy of a mirror angled
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A “doomsday vault” nestled deep in the Arctic received 60,000 new seed samples on Tuesday, including Prince Charles’ cowslips and Cherokee sacred corn, increasing stocks of the world’s agricultural bounty in case of global catastrophe. Mounting concern over climate change and species loss is driving groups worldwide to add their seeds to the collection inside
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Water is one of the most abundant and important substances on Earth, so you think we’d know everything there is to know about it. But it turns out water is way weirder, and it often behaves in ways that leave scientists with more questions than answers. Hosted by: Olivia Gordon SciShow has a spinoff podcast!
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Australia’s wildfires have destroyed more than a fifth of the country’s forests, making the blazes “globally unprecedented” following a years-long drought linked to climate change, researchers said Monday. Climate scientists are currently examining data from the disaster, which destroyed swathes of southeastern Australia, to determine to what extent they can be attributed to rising temperatures.
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Did you ever have a delicious looking apple in your hands and bite in only to find it all grainy and sad? It’s not the fruit’s fault, and there might be something you can do about it! Hosted by: Stefan Chin SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org
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A mysterious comet identified last year as only the second-ever known interstellar object in our Solar System inevitably prompted some big scientific questions. Chief among them: what, if anything, can it tell us about the hypothesised existence of extraterrestrial intelligence out there in space? Well, if the object known as 2I/Borisov holds alien secrets, they’re
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Antarctica is supposed to be an extremely cold place. The annual mean temperature of the snow-laden continent’s central area is -57 degrees Celsius (−70.6°F); even the coast averages around -10°C (14°F). But on February 6, the weather station at Esperanza Base on the Antarctic Peninsula – the northernmost tip of the content – logged the hottest temperature ever
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Go to http://Brilliant.org/SciShow to try their Computational Biology course. The first 200 subscribers get 20% off an annual Premium subscription. Ever since humans found out about germs, we’ve gone a bit overboard inventing antibacterial soap and antibiotics and antifungals. But despite our aversion to them, microbes aren’t all bad, and some of them could even
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Scientists have ‘puppeteered’ the movements of a jellyfish and made it even faster than the real thing. Taking artificial control with a microelectronic implant, researchers have increased the natural swimming speed of a live moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) by nearly threefold. What’s more, they achieved this with only a little bit of external power and
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Our evolutionary history is full of interspecies sex. Different human ancestor species seem to have mingled and mated far more than anthropologists previously realised. Neanderthals interbred with modern humans. Homo sapiens had sex with Denisovans. And 700,000 years ago, according to a new study, a population of ancient humans mated with a distinct unknown population
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Scientists can find answers in some pretty unusual places, and recently they found some evidence that dinosaurs weren’t cold-blooded by looking at… eggshells? Hosted by: Stefan Chin SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Huge thanks go
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