Month: January 2020

The WHO has declared the new coronavirus a global public health emergency—but that doesn’t mean you should panic. Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Huge thanks go to the following Patreon supporters
0 Comments
Go to http://Brilliant.org/SciShow to try out Brilliant’s Daily Challenges. The first 200 subscribers get 20% off an annual Premium subscription. Beetles are the most diverse group of complex organisms on Earth, making up over 20% of all named animal species. One in five species on this planet is…a beetle. How did one group of organisms
0 Comments
Worrying about what other people think at work is something women have to contend with far more than men, a small new study suggests. The experiment included only 32 participants, but economists in Germany say their “clear and consistent” findings are thorough evidence of a newly-identified gender discrepancy. Experiments have found that when people are
0 Comments
This video was sponsored by Fasthosts. Fasthosts are giving UK viewers the chance to win tickets, flight, and accommodation to SXSW 2020 by answering my Techie Test question: https://www.fasthosts.co.uk/scishow Our immune systems are generally pretty great, but sometimes they can turn on us. And for some reason, these autoimmune conditions mostly affect women. Hosted by:
0 Comments
Go to http://Brilliant.org/SciShow to try out Brilliant’s Daily Challenges. The first 200 subscribers get 20% off an annual Premium subscription. What is this strange looking stuff? Is this branch just covered in fungus!? Well, it’s not fungus…but fungus DOES have something to do with it! Hosted by: Olivia Gordon SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s
0 Comments
There’s a lot of stuff up there, whizzing around in low-Earth orbit. Given the thousands of old, defunct satellites that can no longer communicate with Earth, it’s surprising how seldom they collide; but just such a collision might happen this week. According to space debris tracking service LeoLabs, IRAS (a decommissioned space telescope launched in
0 Comments
They were the largest animals to ever walk the Earth: sauropods, a dinosaur clade of such immense size and stature, they’re sometimes dubbed ‘thunder lizards’. These towering hulks – including Brontosaurus, Brachiosaurus, and Diplodocus among others – needed four thick, powerful legs to support and transport their massive bodies. At least, most of the time.
0 Comments
The typefaces you see on yard signs and bumper stickers might hold a hidden meaning for voters. A new psychological study suggests some typefaces read more conservative, or right-leaning, while others come across as more liberal, or left-leaning. In two different surveys, the authors identify four font changes that seem to convey ideological qualities. Gothic-looking
0 Comments
Some fish will never win any beauty pageants, but they still deserve our admiration, respect, and love, especially since their “ugly” traits are actually incredible examples of evolutionary innovation. Hosted by: Oliva Gordon SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on
0 Comments
NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been in orbit around Mars for almost 14 years. It carries a variety of instruments with it, including the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument. That instrument has collected thousands of images of Mars. CRISM’s main purpose is to created detailed maps of the surface mineralogy of
0 Comments
SciShow is supported by Brilliant.org. Go to https://Brilliant.org/SciShow to get 20% off of an annual Premium subscription. During long, cold winters in medieval Europe, church organs grew gray, sickly-looking circles that spread over their pipes. People back then believed that this was the work of the devil, but as it turns out, it’s just some
0 Comments
Over the years, Star Trek has been responsible for inspiring real world innovations from tablet computers to needleless injection devices and real time translators. Now, the science fiction franchise appears to have influenced Space Force, the US military’s newest branch, in its choice of logo: a symbol resembling an arrowhead ringed by an orbiting object
0 Comments
We thought that we taught dogs how to play fetch, but some adorable wolf pups may have just proved us wrong. Also some plants may be immortal? Watch Crash Course Business: Entrepreneurship here! https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8dPuuaLjXtNamNKW5qlS-nKgA0on7Qze Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow
0 Comments
For the first time, scientists have produced snake venom toxins in the lab, opening up a much-needed path for developing drugs and venom antidotes that doesn’t involve having to breed and milk real-life snakes. The toxins have been produced through mini glands called organoids, following a process adapted from growing simplified human organs – something
0 Comments
In an effort to trace a pathway from non-evolving organic chemistry to the first truly living cells, scientists from Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts have proposed those early building blocks contained little-known nucleic acids that aren’t part of any modern genome. The question of how we evolved genomic libraries encoded in DNA that are managed
0 Comments