Month: September 2019

Superconductivity (passing charges through materials without losing heat) promises to revolutionise electronics and power, if we can get it working at reasonable temperatures – and scientists just reported a big step forward in our understanding of the phenomenon. The new discovery centres around the Hubbard model: a maths model of conduction and insulation in materials,
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This week, an alarming report on North American bird populations and a sweet study on one of our more aloof furry companions. Hosted by: Stefan Chin SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Huge thanks go to
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Global warming has put a glacier in the Italian Alps at risk of collapse, officials warned, leading to road closures, travel restrictions, and evacuations in the immediate vicinity. Municipal officials issued the order after surveyors observed a significant increase in the sliding speed of the Planpincieux glacier, which rests on the Italian side of the
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These days we’re used to jaw-dropping photos getting snapped from the International Space Station, but the latest one NASA astronaut Christina Koch recently posted to Twitter comes with a special message, too. The image shows the Soyuz MS-15 spaceflight taking three people to the ISS: Roscosmos cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka and NASA astronaut Jessica Meir as part
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Climate change is already having staggering effects on oceans and ice-filled regions that encompass 80 percent of the Earth, and future damage from rising seas and melting glaciers is now all but certain, according to a sobering new report from the United Nations. The warming climate is killing coral reefs, supercharging monster storms, and fueling
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Radiation sickness been portrayed in movies and television for more than 50 years. And those portrayals vary a lot. But if there’s one thing pretty much all these portrayals have in common, it’s that they get radiation sickness wrong—at least somewhat. Hosted by: Michael Aranda SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check
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You don’t belong here. They’re onto you. Everybody is going to find out the truth. It’s only a matter of time. Dark thoughts like these are symptoms of something called impostor syndrome: a strange psychological phenomenon that makes ordinary people – even brilliant ones – feel like they’re frauds, fakes, inadequate, and undeserving. It doesn’t have
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For several years now, physicists at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) have been running a landmark experiment, recording tens of billions of particles break apart in the hopes of catching a few oddballs. And they finally have some intriguing results to share. This experiment, called NA62, has researchers building and destroying pairs of quarks called
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Diamonds are hardly ever perfect. Like us, they carry blemishes and flaws: tiny ‘inclusions’ of ancient chemistry trapped inside their lustrous frames. To the jeweller, these minuscule marks may diminish a gemstone’s value. To a scientist, the imperfection itself can actually be the true glittering prize. In a startling new discovery, researchers in Canada have
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The second-fastest pulsar ever discovered has been caught spitting out gamma rays, and this surprise discovery could help astronomers better understand the properties of these strange and extreme stars. The gamma radiation of millisecond pulsar PSR J0952−0607 is so faint, detecting it required some clever new search methods – and these made it possible to
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Go to http://curiositystream.com/scishow to start streaming “Curious Minds: Global Food Supply.” Use the promo code ‘scishow’ during the sign-up process to get your first 31 days free! Humans have been eating seafood for thousands of years, but some animals don’t grow very fast, and others taste pretty gross for at least part of the year.
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